Book Review + Giveaway: The End of Business as Usual is Unusual

Brian Solis is known for his attention to detail and his latest book, The End of Business as Usual, is no exception. This is not a light book nor one meant to be read in one sitting. Instead I found it to be a true business textbook, a real resource for anyone looking to understand the changes they’re seeing in consumers. Because what you’ll need from this book will vary, I thought it would be most helpful to outline a game plan for getting the most from this book.

Reading from Beginning to End: Optional

There are clear relationships that Solis builds on from one chapter to the next, but don’t let that stop you from reviewing the table of contents first. Covering everything from how building brands has changed to the impact of Millennials, End of Business is chock full of valuable data, but trying to absorb it all at once isn’t realistic. Unless you’re starting from scratch, I recommend prioritizing the table of contents and tackling one to two sections at a time. Come prepared with a notebook (of either the paper or electronic variety) and plan to take notes, think really hard, and review later.

The Data Supports the Premise

During my first pass through the book, my brain had a hard time absorbing all the numbers that Solis packed into this book. While it can make for some technical reading, End of Business provides a level of research that’s often missing in other business books. If you’re having a hard time convincing “management” (whoever that is anymore) about the validity of your recommendations, Solis provides all the data backup you’ll need in one spot. The level of supporting material in this book is somewhat awe inspiring. One issue I had with the book was the choice to make red the dominant color for the figures, charts, etc. Depending on the image, the quality was hit and miss.

Business Has Changed

To be clear, anyone actively engaged in marketing, either to businesses or consumers, has a choice to make. Do you adapt or do you flounder? How we interact with each other, let alone with businesses, has changed. To pretend that we don’t need to give consideration to these changes is foolish in the extreme. Solis makes a strong case that not only have these changes happened, but how business can adapt and succeed. In this case, Solis doesn’t spout opinion and instead makes logical and thoughtful arguments throughout the book. It’s a pleasant change from the pontificating of so-called gurus and experts who speculate with great enthusiasm, but provide very little actionable information.

Apply as Needed

I strongly suspect that The End of Business as Usual will be the go-to reference book for smart marketers for months, if not years, to come. That said, for you to get your money’s worth you’ll have to be committed to actually reading and analyzing its contents. I commend Solis for asking more of us as readers even as he tells us that attention is fragmented. You may end up going through this book once, twice, or even more, and with every pass, you’ll gain something new to refine your technique and help you be the business that adapts instead of flounders.

We’re Giving Away Books

To help you get started, we’re giving away two copies of The End of Business as Usual. Just leave a comment on this post about why you need the book, we’ll put your name in a hat, and draw two winners. The giveaway ends December 1, at 12 p.m. PT and we’ll announce a winner.

About Britt Raybould

Britt Raybould has a passion for telling stories and she specializes in helping companies figure out how to tell their own stories. Through her firm, Write Bold, she shows companies how storytelling can define them, both to their customers and within their industry. When she remembers to, Britt blogs on her personal sites at bold-words.com and brittraybould.com. You can find Britt on Twitter @britter.

Twitter: britter

23 Responses to Book Review + Giveaway: The End of Business as Usual is Unusual

  1. Rick says:

    As an intern I could use some insights from a professional! I follow his blog and I think he has a fresh insights and really comes up with cool new stuff! It would be great to learn more from Brian.

    Cheers,

    Rick

  2. Chad says:

    As a digital marketing manager, I find myself offering advice on what’s right for the client more than what the client wants or thinks they need.  I try to educate myself as much as possible, but my goal is to educate the client on what works best.  I feel this book has similarities to why some get it and some don’t, and how to better asses that in meetings.

  3. Gtrain25 says:

    As a Business intelligence professional and a consumate social media geek, i would like a copy of his book to spread the news about how social media will forever change the behaviours of consumers.

  4. Edgar Valdmanis says:

    I would appreciate a copy of the book, since my  employer is a a non-profit organisation with limited funds. We try to eduacte our members about the benefits (and possible pitfalls..) of social media and the new business world, and any additional input is valuable. Brian Solis is a great author, so fingers crossed here.

  5. Jason Dojc says:

    Brian Solis has sharp and insightful blog posts. I would love to win his book. “End of Business as Usual”

  6. Diane Toomey says:

    Brian writes they way textbooks read. His observations are supported by facts and charts & graphs (any Brian Solis fan knows infographics are a favorite!). I will utilize The End of Business as Usual in my ongoing transformation from commercial print sales rep to marketing services support consultant. The commercial print business has been struggling with the end of business as usual over the last 10 years, especially. Brian Solis’ blog was the first RSS feed I ever subscribed to years ago. Been a fan ever since.

  7. Joe Sabado says:

    The way Brian Solis blends stats with his story telling style is awesome. Every page is full of insights. I already have the book and it’s a definite must-read!

  8. Vincent says:

    I on a team of analysts and strategists at a large AOR for a handful of the worlds top brands. We are disrupting the process and proving the holistic model to support brand objectives. I consistently refer to Solis for research and idea validation. 

  9. I follow Brian on FB and love his insightful posts and shares.  Can’t wait to read the book… a free one would make that happen a lot sooner :)

  10. The book is here already but I’d like to give it away as a present to people in need. ;-)

  11. I look forward to read this title since solid data is one of the most convincing argument for executive boards if given a proper context. As a young entepreneur I often found myself in a difficult position when presenting my ideas and observation to my bosses. The reason is that I could often conclude and argue why a given new practice or solution would benefit to my company. Due to lack of proper experience, however, I found it difficult to support those ideas with numbers, and with some people if you don’t speak in numbers, you cannot get across…

  12. Anonymous says:

    i am helping ngos and foundations move into the new business paradigm.. love to read some new insights!

  13. Jose B. Neto says:

    Business could change, both in an usual or unusual way, but there is one thing that will never change: the importance of knowledge. That’s why this book is so important for all of us. 

  14. JenRBoyd says:

    Being a social media enthusiast in the financial services industry, I’m very aware of how financial products are poised to change as a result of social media and its impact on consumer behavior. Brett King’s book, Bank 2.0, speaks specifically to this. The challenge in this conservative, compliance heavy industry is convincing senior management that not only is it happening already and poised to disrupt our industry but also that the workforce will not tolerate for long the bans placed on social media. I’m looking forward to reading this book so I can share the WHYS behind this from a respected expert with the people at my company and worldwide in this industry.

  15. I meet Brian Solis at SXSW in 2011 & got Engage signed by him. Love him, loved his presentation, love the book.  Therefore I must have the new book.  I am into Social Media as well as being an entrepreneur, creative director, project manager.  

  16. Gary Wagnon says:

    So many small business owners still operate in the “that’s the way we’ve always done it” mentality because it’s easier and less time consuming than trying to stay on top of the rapidly changing playing field.  I’m looking forward to digesting this book so I can help my small business clients to make the leap into the “new” business world.

  17. Chartertmc says:

    Do you adapt or do you flounder? Why I need this book: I choose to adapt.

  18. Anonymous says:

    I would enjoy reading and sincerely appreciate winning this book.

    Todd McCalla
    Nashville, TN

  19. Cwnyy51 says:

    Your review has caught my interest. I will get and read this book if I am not a fortunate winner.

  20. Kevin Caldwell says:

    I am currently attempting to take a content-heavy organization into the world of social media. It is way behind the times and i could use all the help I can get! Big fan of Brian Solis and his take on breaking out of the business-as-usual mold. Winning is fun too.  

  21. Pat Grady says:

    As a visitor, and as someone who notices trends, I find myself thinking the machines have arrived here.

  22. [...] Book Review + Giveaway: The End of Business as Usual is Unusual [...]

  23. [...] open until 12 p.m. PT, Friday, February 3. We’ll then randomly select two winners.Related Posts:Book Review + Giveaway: The End of Business as Usual is UnusualDespite Amazon Fanfare Kindle Not the Final Chapter on PaperbacksGoogle Takes Aim at Amazon with [...]

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